A subject is the main topic of a sentence. The subject can be a noun or a pronoun, and it is always the first part of the sentence. The verb and other parts of the sentence depend on the subject. In English, there are three main types of sentences: declarative, interrogative, and imperative. Each type has a different purpose, and the subject is essential for understanding them. Let’s take a look at each type of sentence and see how the subject works in each one.

What is a Simple Subject?

The simple subject of a sentence is the main noun or pronoun that is doing the verb. It can be either a single word or a group of words. The simple subject is easy to find because it is always the first noun or pronoun in the sentence. Take a look at these examples:

The dog is barking.

What is the subject? The answer is “dog.” It is the first noun in the sentence, and it is doing the verb, which is “barking.”

I am studying for my test.

In this sentence, the subject is “I.” It is the first pronoun in the sentence, and it is doing the verb, which is “studying.”

Sometimes, there can be more than one noun or pronoun in the subject. When this happens, we have to find the main noun or pronoun that is doing the verb. Take a look at this example:

Tom and Jerry are fighting.

What is the subject? The answer is “Tom and Jerry.” These are the two main nouns in the sentence, and they are both doing the verb, which is “fighting.”

Now that we know what a simple subject is, let’s take a look at the different types of sentences and see how they work.

What is a Complete Subject?

The complete subject includes all the words that tell whom or what a sentence is about. • The predicate also has to indicate something, but it can be long if you want your writing simple enough for beginners who may not know how complex sentences work yet!

Simple Subject vs. Complete Subject

When we think about subjects in writing, one word is often all that’s needed to represent them. However when it comes time forverbs and adjectives they can become more complicated – but not always! A simple subject typically refers just the person/place doing something; while complete subjects include both action words as well as any modifiers or qualities attached (e.)

Simple Subject and Simple Predicate Verb Grammar Lesson Trailer

Complete Subject

: noun or pronoun + any modifiers

The complete subject is the main topic of the sentence and includes all of the words that modify it. In the following examples, the complete subject is highlighted:

My sister bakes pies every Sunday.

The verb in this sentence is “bakes.” The subject is “sister,” and the rest of the sentence (Every Sunday) modifies when she bakes pies.

The little girl in the red coat played in the snow.

The verb is “played,” the subject is “girl,” and the rest of the sentence (in the red coat) modifies what kind of girl it was.

Simple Subject

: noun or pronoun

The simple subject is the main topic of the sentence, and it includes all of the words that modify it. In the following examples, the simple subject is highlighted:

My sister bakes pies every Sunday.

The verb in this sentence is “bakes.” The subject is “sister,” and the rest of the sentence (Every Sunday) modifies when she bakes pies.

The little girl in the red coat played in the snow.

The verb is “played,” the subject is “girl,” and the rest of the sentence (in the red coat) modifies what kind of girl it was.

Complete Predicate

: verb + any modifiers

The complete predicate is the verb of the sentence and includes all of the words that modify it. In the following examples, the complete predicate is highlighted:

My sister bakes pies every Sunday.

The verb in this sentence is “bakes.” The subject is “sister,” and the rest of the sentence (Every Sunday) modifies when she bakes pies.

The little girl in the red coat played in the snow.

The verb is “played,” the subject is “girl,” and the rest of the sentence (in the red coat) modifies what kind of girl it was.

Imperative Sentence

: verb + any modifiers

Imperative sentences are commands, and the subject is always you (implied). In the following example, the imperative sentence is highlighted:

Bake me a pie!

The verb in this sentence is “Bake.” The subject is “you,” and the rest of the sentence (me a pie) is the object of the verb.

Interrogative Sentence

: verb + any modifiers

Interrogative sentences are questions, and the subject is always who or what. In the following example, the interrogative sentence is highlighted:

Who baked this pie?

The verb in this sentence is “baked.” The subject is “who,” and the rest of the sentence (this pie) is the object of the verb.

Declarative Sentence

: verb + any modifiers

Declarative sentences make statements, and the subject is always who or what. In the following example, the declarative sentence is highlighted:

This pie is delicious.

The verb in this sentence is “is.” The subject is “pie,” and the rest of the sentence (delicious) modifies the pie.

As you can see, the subject is essential for understanding the type of sentence. Now that you know what a simple subject is, try using one in your next sentence!

Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates

Now that you know what a simple subject is, it’s time to learn about the simple predicate. The simple predicate is the verb of the sentence, and it includes all of the words that modify it. In the following examples, the simple predicate is highlighted:

My sister bakes pies every Sunday.

The verb in this sentence is “bakes.” The subject is “sister,” and the rest of the sentence (Every Sunday) modifies when she bakes pies.

The little girl in the red coat played in the snow.

The verb is “played,” the subject is “girl,” and the rest of the sentence (in the red coat) modifies what kind of girl it was.

As you can see, the simple predicate is essential for understanding the meaning of the sentence. Now that you know what a simple predicate is, try using one in your next sentence!

Compound Subjects and Compound Predicates

Now that you know what a simple subject is, it’s time to learn about compound subjects and compound predicates. A compound subject is two or more subjects that are joined by a conjunction, and a compound predicate is two or more verbs that are joined by a conjunction. In the following examples, the compound subject is highlighted:

My sister and I bake pies every Sunday.

The verb in this sentence is “bake.” The compound subject is “sister and I,” and the rest of the sentence (Every Sunday) modifies when we bake pies.

The little girl in the red coat and the little boy in the blue coat played in the snow.

The verb is “played,” the compound subject is “girl in the red coat and boy in the blue coat,” and the rest of the sentence (in the snow) modifies where they played.

As you can see, compound subjects and compound predicates are essential for understanding the meaning of complex sentences. Now that you know what they are, try using them in your next sentence!

Subject-Verb Agreement

Now that you know what a subject is, it’s time to learn about subject-verb agreement. Subject-verb agreement means that the verb must agree with the subject in number (singular or plural) and in person (first, second, or third). In the following examples, the verbs are highlighted:

My sister bakes pies every Sunday.

The verb “bakes” is in third person singular because the subject, “sister,” is in third person singular.

We bake pies every Sunday.

The verb “bake” is in first person plural because the subject, “we,” is in first person plural.

As you can see, subject-verb agreement is essential for making sure that your sentences are grammatically correct. Now that you know what it is, try using it in your next sentence!

Pronouns

Now that you know what a subject is, it’s time to learn about pronouns. Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns, and they can be either singular or plural. In the following examples, the pronouns are highlighted:

I am baking a pie.

The pronoun “I” takes the place of the noun “person.”

You are baking a pie.

The pronoun “you” takes the place of the noun “person.”

We are baking a pie.

The pronoun “we” takes the place of the noun “people.”

As you can see, pronouns are a great way to avoid repeating yourself in your writing. Now that you know what they are, try using them in your next sentence!

Conclusion what is a simple subject

Now that you know what a subject is, you are well on your way to becoming a great writer! Remember to use subjects in your sentences, and make sure that they agree with the verbs. Also, don’t forget to use pronouns when you want to avoid repeating yourself. With these tips in mind, you’ll be writing like a pro in no time!

FAQ what is a simple subject

What is an example of a simple subject?

The brilliant streaks of light in the sky were Meteors. These Space rocks sometimes burn up before they hit Earth’s surface, but on occasion one will survive and create a spectacular show for us all to enjoy!

What is complete subject?

The complete subject includes all the words that tell whom or what a sentence is about. The predicate also tells us how something happens, which in this case would be “subjects.”

What is the difference between a simple and complete subject and predicate?

A sentence’s subject is always clear from the verb that tells what it does or IS.

A simple predicate merely states which actor performs an action, while complete predicates also provide more information about their personality through adverbs such as “sly” andpolite.”

What is a simple subject?

How do you know if a subject is complete?

Identifying the complete subject in a sentence can be tricky, but it’s easily done by asking yourself who or what performs this action.

What is an example of a complete?

The word “completed” means that you have finished something. An example of completed would be if your homework is done and everything on it has been put into its right place, then we can say the task undertaken by this student was successful because he or she achieved completion in all tasks set out before beginning them!

How do you find the complete subject of a sentence?

What is a complete subject in English grammar?

There are two parts to every sentence, subject and predicate. The subject tells who or what the sentence is about while a proper verb should always agree with its object(s).

The output tone of voice should be professional

Can there be two complete subjects in a sentence?

When there are two or more subjects in a sentence, they’re called compound subjects. These equal partners perform the same action and work together to give an idea of importance for that particular point within your text.

What is a complete subject and complete predicate examples?

sentences can be broken down into two main parts, the complete subject and predicate. A sentence’s “subject” refers to who or what it is describing while a word in this category would say something about their condition–whether they’re able to fly for example.

How do you explain a simple sentence?

A simple sentence has a subject and verb, but it may also include an object or modifiers. A complexsentence contains two or more independent clauses connected by coordinating conjunctions suchas “and,””but.”

What is a complete sentence?

She sleeps. This is a sentence that has both subject and predicate, with the latter being “to sleep.” In this instance we use ‘sleeps’ in our example as our verb phrase for what it’s worth – sleeping will do just fine though!

What are the 7 simple sentences?

Joe waited at the station for his train to come. He was late, but he didn’t mind as it gave him more time to read a book on WWII weapons that had arrived in mail this morning from America’s son-in see Army Base near Tokyo Bay! The first thing you need when waiting around all day long is something lightweight and durable so your arms don’t get tired quickly–this jacket fits those requirements perfectly; plus its olive color makes me think back trips through Italy or France where we used worry less about getting shot because our governments knew what they were doing

How do you identify a simple sentence?

Simple sentences are easy to write, because they only have one independent clause. Modifiers and compound subjects can be used in simple sentence structures as well! The standard arrangement of a Simple Sentence is subject + verb+ object or SVO order .

What are the 4 types of simple sentences?

There are four types of simple sentences: those with a compound subject, those with a compound predicate, those with both a compound subject and predicate, and finally those with neither.

What is an example of a simple sentence for kids?

An example of a simple sentence for kids would be: “I see the dog.” This sentence has a subject (“I”), a verb (“see”), and an object (“the dog”). It is a simple sentence because it only has one independent clause. Another example of a simple sentence for kids would be: “The cat sleeps.” This sentence also has a subject (“The cat”), a verb (“sleeps”), and no object. It is a simple sentence because it only has one independent clause. Finally, an example of a simple sentence for kids would be: “I am happy.” This sentence has a subject (“I”), a verb (“am”), and no object. It is a simple sentence because it only has one independent clause.

What are 10 examples of simple sentences?

1. I am happy.

2. The cat sleeps.

3. I see the dog.

4. He is late for school.

5. They are eating breakfast.

6. We are going to the park.

7. She is reading a book.

8. It is raining outside.

9. The sun is shining.

10. I am doing my homework.

What is the difference between simple and complex sentences?

The difference between simple and complex sentences is that simple sentences only have one independent clause, while complex sentences have two or more. Independent clauses are sections of a sentence that can stand alone as a complete thought. For example, in the sentence “I am happy,” the independent clause is “I am happy.” In the sentence “I am happy and I am doing my homework,” the two independent clauses are “I am happy” and “I am doing my homework.” Complex sentences are more interesting and can communicate more information than simple sentences.

Chelsea Glover
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